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OLIVIA YOUNG ART & DESIGN

@OliviaYoung145


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BBC Design Trainee Scheme Application 2012 - The Bauhaus - Olivia Young.
These are some of the pages I submitted as part of my application. The brief was to design a hypothetical programme about one member of The Bauhaus, a famous German Art movement. After a lot of research ( and the discovery I didnt actually like The Bauhaus or their style) I felt a bit stumped on what to do. Then I realised I should look into the characters of the members of the Bauhaus, and the ones who appealed to me most were the women.
Their lives were massively different to the male members of the Bauhaus, and therefore they intrigued me more. They were limited to a number of arts they could practice, as more ‘masculine’ ones such as sculpture were deemed un feminine and unsuitable. A gentle, medieval approach to women and art was adopted, where pottery, and sewing were the order of the day.
Gunta Stolzl was the woman who inspired me to design the most. She was one of the only women to graduate the Bauhaus, and she then became a teacher there, and the Head of her own department, much to the dismay of many members of the Bauhaus. She was an expert weaver, and her designs and materials used were innovative and ground breaking. Her designs were the most commericially successful throughout the Bauhaus.
Her decision to marry a Jewish man just before World War 2 was both a brave and risky. She was driven out of the Bauhaus by her fellow teachers and even her students for her alliance with a Jew - despite all she had done for them. She fled to Switzerland with her young daughter where she set up a school of her own, to carry on her teachings.
I thought the two seperate parts of her life - the part where she excells in her craft, graduates, and starts to teach her skills to her own class should be a bright, joyous time. A light, cluttered classroom full of busyness and peoples work, half finished linens and paintings would display the creative, fun atmosphere I wanted. 
Her darker times, when her husband was forced to flee, when she was alone with her daughter in an increasingly Nazi Germany, shunned by her collegues and pupils, I thought a claustrophobic, trapped atmosphere would work well. Taking references from Film Noir, I thought her office’s tall paned windows created a caged effect with darkness consuming her work space, the only light source coming from the freedom outside and beyond the Bauhaus.
I was pleased with my submission, as I feel a set is complete when the story of the character who lives there is very clear and apparant. I hope I did justice to what an inspirational woman Gunta was.

BBC Design Trainee Scheme Application 2012 - The Bauhaus - Olivia Young.

These are some of the pages I submitted as part of my application. The brief was to design a hypothetical programme about one member of The Bauhaus, a famous German Art movement. After a lot of research ( and the discovery I didnt actually like The Bauhaus or their style) I felt a bit stumped on what to do. Then I realised I should look into the characters of the members of the Bauhaus, and the ones who appealed to me most were the women.

Their lives were massively different to the male members of the Bauhaus, and therefore they intrigued me more. They were limited to a number of arts they could practice, as more ‘masculine’ ones such as sculpture were deemed un feminine and unsuitable. A gentle, medieval approach to women and art was adopted, where pottery, and sewing were the order of the day.

Gunta Stolzl was the woman who inspired me to design the most. She was one of the only women to graduate the Bauhaus, and she then became a teacher there, and the Head of her own department, much to the dismay of many members of the Bauhaus. She was an expert weaver, and her designs and materials used were innovative and ground breaking. Her designs were the most commericially successful throughout the Bauhaus.

Her decision to marry a Jewish man just before World War 2 was both a brave and risky. She was driven out of the Bauhaus by her fellow teachers and even her students for her alliance with a Jew - despite all she had done for them. She fled to Switzerland with her young daughter where she set up a school of her own, to carry on her teachings.

I thought the two seperate parts of her life - the part where she excells in her craft, graduates, and starts to teach her skills to her own class should be a bright, joyous time. A light, cluttered classroom full of busyness and peoples work, half finished linens and paintings would display the creative, fun atmosphere I wanted. 

Her darker times, when her husband was forced to flee, when she was alone with her daughter in an increasingly Nazi Germany, shunned by her collegues and pupils, I thought a claustrophobic, trapped atmosphere would work well. Taking references from Film Noir, I thought her office’s tall paned windows created a caged effect with darkness consuming her work space, the only light source coming from the freedom outside and beyond the Bauhaus.

I was pleased with my submission, as I feel a set is complete when the story of the character who lives there is very clear and apparant. I hope I did justice to what an inspirational woman Gunta was.

Friday, 8 - 02 - 2013